Archive for July 12, 2011


littlegirlbigvoice

The Little Little Girl with the Big Big Voice by Kristen Balouch

A little, little girl has a very loud voice.  She heads out looking for a friend to play with.  She searches the jungle, but her big voice scares the animals away.  First, an elephant run, then a snake, then a crocodile!  It’s not until she meets a very loud and very large lion and isn’t scared by his roar, that she makes a friend. 

Balouch has created a book that is bright, funny and loud.  Her text is simple and easily read aloud, loudly.  It has a rhythm that is natural and easy as well as a strong structure of repetition.  As the little girl meets each animal, there is the happy greeting and then the little girl opens her mouth.  Words in each encounter are bright colored and larger, so readers will know where the punch of sound belongs.

The illustrations are just as loud as the little girl.  Just like the cover, they are filled with hot pinks, oranges, zingy greens, and bright blues.  The noise waves, whenever the little girl talks, are depicted in circles of color emanating from her.  This adds to the color, motion and zip of the book.

A winning book about being different and finding acceptance without changing, this book is a readaloud win for any child who is loud themselves.  Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from copy received from Simon & Schuster.

beebird

Bee & Bird by Craig Frazier

A simple wordless story is made remarkable by bright, graphic illustrations.  This is the story of a bee and a bird and their journey, but what journey are they on?  They are in a tree, the tree is on a truck, and then could the truck be driving on the back of a cow?  Then there’s a boat on an ocean, that is actually a toy boat.  As perspectives shift, the epic adventure becomes more of a neighborhood jaunt.  It’s a trip that readers will happily make with the pair, finding surprises at almost every page turn.

Frazier, author of the wonderful Lots of Dots, has created another great book for children.  His vibrant illustrations use bold colors, strong shapes, and inventive perspectives to turn a normal day into a series of surprising twists.

Art teachers will embrace this book for its clear depiction of perspective.  At the same time, it is also a rocking picture book that young readers will equally enjoy.  Appropriate for ages 3-6, older when used to discuss perspective.

Reviewed from copy received from Roaring Brook Press.

Also reviewed by

Check out the book trailer for some of those perspective shifts:
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