Tag Archive: alligators


okay andy

Okay, Andy! by Maxwell Eaton III

The author of the Max and Pinky books returns with a new duo, Andy and Preston.  Andy is an alligator and Preston is a young coyote.  The two of them make an unlikely team but one that works incredibly well for humor.  Preston often can’t figure out what is really going on.  So when Andy is hunting a rabbit, Preston thinks it is a game of tag.  In the next chapter, Preston wants to take every thing they find, though Andy holds onto a stick for himself.  Andy is so distracted that he doesn’t see the cliff coming and then he lets loose his anger on Preston.  Then it is up to Andy to make things right, if he can.  In the final chapter, Andy is trying to sleep when Preston wants to have him guess what kind of animal noise Preston is making.  This quickly descends into a merry chaos and then the book comes full circle back to the rabbit in a very satisfying ending.

This is a graphic novel perfect for beginning readers.  Eaton tells the story in just a few words, letting the illustrations carry most of the story rather than the words.  He uses repeating words too, making it even funnier and also making it easier for the youngest readers to decipher.  Filled with silly action, the book does speak to the ins and outs of friendship.  Eaton’s art is clear and clean, his thick black lines filled with simple colors.  The result is a graphic novel that is simple, easy and cheerful.

A great pick for beginning readers, children will enjoy the graphic novel format and the humor.  Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from digital galley received from Edelweiss and Blue Apple Books.

oliver and his alligator

Oliver and His Alligator by Paul Schmid

Oliver sometimes isn’t as brave as he’d like to be, and that is especially true on the first day of school.  So he headed to the swamp and picked up an alligator, “just in case things got rough.”  When Oliver got to school a woman who was not his mother greeted him and asked his name.  In his panic, Oliver couldn’t remember his name, but he could say “munch, munch!” and the alligator ate the lady.  A similar thing happened when a little girl in the class asked Oliver what he loved.  Oliver wanted to answer and even had a great reply, but he found that he could only say “munch, munch!” and the alligator ate the girl.  As Oliver steadily had his alligator munch his classmates, the classroom got much quieter and lonelier.  But what is a boy to do when everyone has been eaten?

Schmid tells this story with a wonderful matter-of-fact tone that leaves readers shocked at first but then delighting in this clever answer to the worries of the first day of school.  I guarantee a wonderful stunned moment if you share this book aloud, and then a rush of nervous but genuine glee at it all. 

The book is cleanly designed with very simple lines that allow the humor of the situation to really shine.  The simplicity is beautiful and entirely modern thanks to Oliver’s oversized sweater and mop of hair. 

Beautiful, clever and a joy to share aloud, this book is riotously funny and oh so true.  A great addition to starting-school shelves.  Appropriate for ages 4-6.

john jensen feels different

John Jensen Feels Different by Henrik Hovland, illustrated by Torill Kove

John Jensen lives in Norway.  He lives in an apartment, eats cereal for breakfast, brushes his teeth, and takes the bus to work.  But he feels different than everyone else and knows that people are looking at him because he is different.  He notices that no one else wears a bowtie, so he changes and wears a regular one.  But he still feels different.  John Jensen decides that the real problem is his tail, since no one else has a tail like his.  So he ties it up and hides it, but all that results in is not being able to sit comfortably and losing his balance.  In fact, he loses it so badly that he falls and has to go to the doctor.  Thank goodness that Dr. Field turns out to be just what John Jensen needs, a friendly doctor who is also an elephant.

Told in a deadpan voice, this book is pure delight.  John Jensen is obviously different, since he’s an alligator.  But the book never gives that away except in the illustrations.  Instead, it is told as if he is just another Norwegian on the bus.  The tension leading to the realization builds and is only partly fixed by the appearance of the elephant towards the end.  The book ends shortly thereafter with no sudden realization by John Jensen, just an acceptance that he truly is different.  I loved the fact that there was no culminating event at the end, because it made the book really work as a vehicle to talk about all sorts of differences even if you are a human too.

Kove’s illustrations add to the deadpan humor of it all.  There are marvelous touches like Camus’ The Stranger as bedtime reading, and the fact that absolutely no one on the bus is actually looking at John Jensen.  The illustrations are a large part of what really create the strong Norwegian setting that permeates the book. 

Translated from Norwegian, this is a striking picture book in so many ways.  It will be one of those books that children shout at thanks to the deadpan nature and the lack of reveal, and I love sharing those books with kids.  After all, we all feel different and even a bit green and scaly at times.  Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from copy received from Eerdmans Books for Young Readers.

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