Category: Uncategorized

This Week’s Tweets, Pins and Tumbls

Here are some cool links I shared on my Twitter, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts this week:

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Award Winning Kids Books Get Adaptation Deals

Candlewick Announces Fourth Barnett-Klassen Collaboration

Fall 2017 Children’s Sneak Previews

Frederick Douglass booklist — The Horn Book

Here are some of my favorite picture books and pop-up books for Valentine’s Day.

J.K. Rowling Doesn’t Mind if You Burn ‘Harry Potter’ Books

Mirrors for My Daughter’s Bookshelf

Refugees welcome here: resources and booklist — The Horn Book

The Return of Shel Silverstein’s ‘Runny Babbit’

Video: Oliver Jeffers on how children’s books and fine art are keeping him a busy man

LIBRARIES

The Free Instrument Lending Library (FRILL)

The Miseducation of Dylann Roof [Southern Poverty Law Center]

The Newberry Library is building an archive of protest signs and other ephemera from the marches this month:

A Public Library That’s Nicer Than The Fanciest Tech Offices

This very popular pin has a typo in it--did you notice? Book is spelled wrong. That's the kind of quality check I specialize in.:

TEEN READS

3 Reasons Why We Need More YA Books About Girls Who Play Sports

25 of Our Most Anticipated February YA Books

Amulet to Adapt Lumberjanes Comics into Novels

“Nevertheless, She Persisted” A YA book list

What’s Life Like For Immigrant Kids? 2 Teen Novels Paint A Sober Picture

2017 Waterstone Children’s Book Prize Shortlist

The shortlist for the 2017 Waterstone Children’s Book Prize has been released. This is a British book prize, so some of the books may not yet be available in the US. The prize has three age categories with six finalists in each category:

ILLUSTRATED BOOKS

The Bear Who Stared 28818766

The Bear Who Stared by Duncan Beedie

The Journey by Francesca Sanna

 Super Stan

Life Is Magic by Meg McLaren

Super Stan by Matt Robertson

There's a tiger in the garden Tiger in a Tutu

There’s a Tiger in the Garden by Lizzy Stewart

Tiger in a Tutu by Fabi Santiago

 

YOUNGER READERS

Beetle Boy (The Battle of the Beetles #1) Captain Pug

Beetle Boy by M. G. Leonard

Captain Pug by Laura James

Cogheart (The Cogheart Adventures, #1) The Girl of Ink and Stars

Cogheart by Peter Bunzl

The Girl of Ink and Stars by Kiran Millwood-Hargrave

Time Travelling with a Hamster Wolf Hollow

Time Travelling with a Hamster by Ross Welford

Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

 

OLDER READERS

Anna and the Swallow Man Hour of the Bees

Anna and the Swallow Man by Gavriel Savit

Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eagar

Orangeboy Paper Butterflies

Orangeboy by Patrice Lawrence

Paper Butterflies by Lisa Heathfield

The Sun Is Also a Star The Wildings (The Wildings, #1)

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

The Wildings by Nilanjana Roy

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

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We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

Released February 14, 2017.

Marin left her entire old life behind, arriving at college in New York two weeks ahead of schedule and with almost nothing with her. She tried to leave that life behind and start anew, but now her best friend Mabel is coming to see her. The best friend that Marin hasn’t spoken to in months, the best friend she hasn’t texted or called. Left alone in the deserted dorm as winter break arrives, Marin can only wait for Mabel to arrive. When she does, they are awkward together and the story of their relationship slowly reveals itself. Along the way, Marin’s unique relationship with her grandfather also emerges. Now it is up to Marin to face everything she has run from for the first time.

I knew on the very first page that this was a book that would consume me. LaCour writes with a precision and yet a naturalness that disarms and embraces the reader. She is delicate at times, allowing the reader to explore and learn. At other points she is direct, pointing out pain, tenderness and loss with care. The tone is uniquely hers, a voice that is beautiful to read, filled with poignancy, hesitation and wonder all the while it fights depression and despair.

This is a novel of hope, a novel that shows how difficult it can be to face loss and betrayal. It is a book that speaks of the power of bridging those gaps in our lives, of finding a person we love once again and allowing them back into our lives. It’s a story of slowly opening that door, the door to humanity and joy that had seemed locked forever. It’s a story of transformation that is simple and yet profound.

One of the best young adult books on loss and grief that I have ever read, this one will find a place in your heart. Appropriate for ages 14-18.

Reviewed from ARC received from Dutton Books for Young Readers.

 

Bear Likes Jam by Ciara Gavin

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Bear Likes Jam by Ciara Gavin

Released February 14, 2017.

This is the third book in the sweet series about a bear that lives with a flock of ducks. Bear discovers his love of jam and forgot to share it with the ducklings. He ate it late at night and during the day. Mama Duck worried that Bear wasn’t eating a balanced diet, even though Bear proved that he could balance very well. So she started trying to feed Bear vegetables at dinner with no jam. Bear refused to even taste them and went to bed hungry. Breakfast was oatmeal with no jam in sight. Dinner came around with no jam either. But then the ducks showed Bear a new game! It was a game that got him eating vegetables without even noticing and then he was a happy bear because he could also have a jar or two of jam a day along with the ducks.

Throughout this series, Gavin has played off of the fact that Bear has unique needs just because he’s a bear compared to all of the other ducks in the family. The last book was about hibernating and this one is about delicious foods. Bear is a wonderful character who just is who he is. His love of jam suits his character perfectly and once again the ducks band together to create a solution to help Bear be healthier and yet still be himself too.

The art has delicate lines, the ducklings tiny compared to the mountainous bear. The watercolors add sweep across some pages, but most of the pages use white as a background. Small details add to the appeal with flowered pillows on seats to get little ducklings high enough and ducklings merrily munching on fruits and vegetables.

A book that addresses healthy eating with a sense of balance and plenty of sweetness. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from e-galley received from Edelweiss and Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Lesser Spotted Animals by Martin Brown

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Lesser Spotted Animals by Martin Brown

This book doesn’t include any koalas or bears or bison or tigers. Instead it’s full of mammals who tend to be ignored. In fact, I guarantee that there are animals here that you’ve never even heard of! All of them are amazing but for very different reasons. There’s the Cuban Solenodon, an insectivore with a poisonous bite. There’s the impossible to find and count Sand Cat who lives in the deserts of Africa and Central Asia. There’s the stinky Zorilla who can be smelled up to a mile away. Turning the pages of this book is a journey of discovery that is just right for any kid tired of the same old popular animals and up for a look at truly wild animals.

Brown’s tone in the book is masterful. He uses humor perfectly, creating moments of asides that made me guffaw aloud. This is one of the rare nonfiction animal books for children that you won’t mind reading aloud, even multiple times! It is full of fun facts, interesting tidbits and then that zing of humor that makes it entirely enjoyable. Brown picks his animals carefully, offering just the right amount of detail on each animal and then moving on merrily to the next.

Brown’s illustrations contribute to some of the best humor in the book. He uses images that are similar to mug shots of the various animals to show their similarities and differences to more familiar animals. He also uses comic-like speech bubbles and frames to create silly asides that add immensely to the appeal.

A delight of a nonfiction book about animals, here’s hoping that it’s the first in a series. Appropriate for ages 7-9.

Reviewed from ARC received from Scholastic.