The Children’s Book Council of Australia 2017 Book Awards

The winners of the 2017 Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Book of the Year Awards have been announced. Here are the winning titles and honor books in each category:

OLDER READERS – WINNER

One Would Think the Deep

One Would Think the Deep by Claire Zorn

 

OLDER READERS – HONOUR BOOKS

The Bone Sparrow Words in Deep Blue

The Bone Sparrow by Zana Fraillon

Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley

 

YOUNGER READERS – WINNER

29859728

Rockhopping by Trace Balla

 

YOUNGER READERS – HONOUR BOOKS

Captain Jimmy Cook Discovers Third Grade Dragonfly Song

Captain Jimmy Cook Discovers Third Grade by Kate Temple, Jol Temple and John Foye

Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD – WINNER

Go Home, Cheeky Animals!

Go Home, Cheeky Animals! by Johanna Bell, illustrated by Dion Beasley

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD – HONOUR BOOKS

Gary Nannie Loves

Gary by Leila Rudge

Nannie Loves by Kylie Dunstan

 

PICTURE BOOK – WINNER

Home in the Rain

Home in the Rain by Bob Graham

 

PICTURE BOOK – HONOUR BOOKS

28953863 The Patchwork Bike

Mechanica by Lance Balchin

The Patchwork Bike by Maxine Beneba Clark, illustrated by Van T. Rudd

 

EVE POWNALL AWARD FOR INFORMATION BOOKS – WINNER

Amazing animals of Australia's national parks

Amazing Animals for Australia’s National Parks by Gina M. Newton

 

EVE POWNALL AWARD FOR INFORMATION BOOKS – HONOUR BOOKS

A-Z of Endangered Animals - Jennifer Cossins The Gigantic Book of Genes - Lorna Hendry

A-Z of Endangered Animals by Jennifer Cossins

The Gigantic Book of Genes by Lorna Hendry

 

CRICHTON AWARD FOR DEBUT ILLUSTRATOR

The Patchwork Bike

The Patchwork Bike by Maxine Beneba Clark, illustrated by Van T. Rudd

The Secret Sheriff of Sixth Grade by Jordan Sonnenblick

The Secret Sheriff of Sixth Grade by Jordan Sonnenblick

The Secret Sheriff of Sixth Grade by Jordan Sonnenblick (9780545863209, Amazon)

Released August 29, 2017.

Maverick knows that sixth grade is going to be his year. This year he’s going to make a difference. He’s going to help those smaller than him, if he can find anyone shorter than he is. He’s going to stand up to bullies, particularly Jamie and Bowen, who have tormented him for years. But being a hero is not as simple as carrying the plastic badge that his father left him. Every time that Maverick tries to help, things turn out worse, often for him. He can’t stand up to his mother’s abusive boyfriend, can’t get his mother to stop drinking so much, and can’t seem to stop ending up in the assistant principal’s office. Can you be a hero when your own life is endless trouble?

Sonnenblick’s take on sixth grade is wonderfully dark and funny. He looks straight at bullying in middle school and clearly understands it. This book grapples with serious subjects such as physical abuse, abandonment, alcoholism and the loss of a parent. Happily, Maverick is a character who somehow manages to look at these troubles with a sarcastic wit that allows readers to cope as well. When looked at without Maverick’s lens on things, his home life is not only terrible but dangerous as well. Sonnenblick manages to use humor not to minimize these issues but to allow readers to see them clearly without pity but with lots of empathy.

Sonnenblick’s take on school administration is equally successful. He creates a pair of horrors for students: The Bee who is the terrifying assistant principal and The Bird who is the awful school nurse. The Bee turns out to have a heart of gold and to be aware of what is happening in the halls almost before the students are. The Bird on the other hand wields Lysol spray as antiseptic for cuts.

A triumphant story of a young hero who finds help in unlikely places on his journey. Appropriate for ages 9-12.

Reviewed from ARC received from Scholastic.

Be Quiet! by Ryan T. Higgins

Be Quiet! by Ryan T. Higgins

Be Quiet! by Ryan T. Higgins (9781484731628, Amazon)

Rupert the mouse has decided to create a wordless picture book. Unfortunately though, his friends just keep making noise and ruining everything. The two other mice even talk about not talking and keeping the book wordless. They try to help make strong illustrations, but don’t quite understand the concept. Then they start bringing new ideas into the illustrations: vegetarian vegetables, potatoes, superheroes, and even some high brow art. They try miming because they know that is silent, but it still doesn’t stop them chatting. Rupert finally loses it in the end with hilarious results.

This book is so funny that it will have readers laughing out loud. Higgins, author of Mother Bruce, has a great sense of comedic timing, adding just the right commentary by the mice at the best moments. The series of different illustrations is wonderfully funny as are Rupert’s reactions to the other mice. There is a natural quality to their conversations that make it all the more believable that they simply are unaware they are still talking to one another.

The illustrations are exactly what one would look for in an artistic picture book that is wordless, which makes the premise all the more funny. Set in a lush natural area, there are woods, running brooks and other elements. The three mice are cleverly drawn, each distinct from one another in color and attitude.

This is a natural read aloud that will be a wild one to share with a preschool group. Brace yourself for lots of laughs. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from library copy.

 

Lily’s Cat Mask by Julie Fortenberry

Lily's Cat Mask by Julie Fortenberry

Lily’s Cat Mask by Julie Fortenberry (9780425287996, Amazon)

When Lily and her father go school shopping, Lily isn’t sure she wants to go to school at all. When she asks her father to buy her a cat mask, he agrees and Lily wears it right out of the store. Lily wore the mask all the time, whether she wanted to be noticed or invisible, with friends or with strangers. She wore it to the first day of school, but her teacher only let her wear it at recess. Then one day at school, they had a costume party and Lily discovered another cat in her class!

This picture book tells the story of a little girl who uses the cat mask in order to cope with new situations. While she struggles with starting school, her mask gives her courage. It’s lovely that the book also depicts her wearing it at home whether she is happy or grumpy and in a wide variety of situations. The book also depicts a very understanding and loving single father who doesn’t push Lily to change.

The illustrations are filled with diversity in a very natural way. When Lily and her father are shopping, Lily is almost boneless in the illustrations, clearly being dragged along until she discovers her cat mask. Lily may be shy but she is also clearly imaginative, curious and silly. She is far from a one-dimensional quiet child.

A great look at a quiet child who faces school in a clever way. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from library copy.

 

 

This Week’s Tweets, Pins and Tumbls

Here are some cool links I shared on my Twitter, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts this week:

close-your-eyes

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Now by Antoinette Portis

Now by Antoinette Portis

Now by Antoinette Portis (9781626721371, Amazon)

This picture book celebrates living in the now as a little girl walks readers through her favorite things. Each of them is her favorite because it is the one she is interacting with right then. It is her favorite cloud because it’s the one she is watching. This is her favorite song because it’s the one she is singing.

The book is pure simplicity with its concept and the art. The concept is used throughout the book, the writing straight forward and also celebrating something deeper too. It’s about a connection to the present moment and a joy in just spending time doing exactly what you are doing and loving it.

The art of the picture book also speaks to the connection with the now. Done in thick lines and rich matte colors, the illustrations show the playful nature of simple pleasures in life.

Perfect for those of us who love the book we are reading right now most of all, this picture book is about simple pleasures and enjoying the current moment fully. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from library copy.

Here Comes Teacher Cat by Deborah Underwood

Here Comes Teacher Cat by Deborah Underwood

Here Comes Teacher Cat by Deborah Underwood (9780399539053, Amazon)

The latest in the long Here Comes Cat series, this picture book is just as charming and fun as the earlier ones in the series. In this book, Cat is asked to step in as a substitute teacher. He’s not happy about it at all, since he wants to nap. Plus, he’s not really comfortable around kittens. Cat attempts to get out of it several times, but finally is in front of the class. They try music first, but Cat’s rock and roll approach disturbs other classes. They build with blocks, which turns out brilliantly and offers a snack too! Art is next and it gets really messy just as the teacher returns to the class room. Can Cat and the kittens get everything cleaned up in time?

I love the way that Cat is always teetering just on the edge of disaster throughout the book. He also has is own style of approaching everything that adds to the chaos and the fun. Putting him in charge of a classroom is rather like putting a child in charge, since he react so much that way and the results play out in a similar fashion as Cat figures it all out on the fly.

Just as with the other Cat books, the book has minimal words and Cat communicates by holding up signs with pictures on them. It’s a trick that the kittens learn by the end of the book, which is a great way to end a long day of teaching.

Just right for early days of school, this picture book is silly fun. Appropriate for ages 2-4.

Reviewed from copy received from Dial Books.