12 New August Children’s Books to Wake Your Brain Cells

Here are 12 children’s books coming out in August that have gotten starred reviews and praise. Lots of familiar names and some new ones too.

Cover for Bad Sister

Bad Sister by Charise Mericle Harper, illustrated by Rory Lucey

Cover for Being Clem

Being Clem by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Cover for Black Boy Joy

Black Boy Joy edited by Kwame Mbalia

Cover for Dead Wednesday

Dead Wednesday by Jerry Spinelli

Cover for Elvis and the World As It Stands

Elvis and the World as It Stands by Lisa Frenkel Riddiough, illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

Cover for Erik vs. Everything

Erik vs. Everything by Christina Uss

Cover for Fast Pitch

Fast Pitch by Nic Stone

Cover for Indiana Bones

Indiana Bones by Harry Heape, illustrated by Rebecca Bagley

Cover for Just Be Cool, Jenna Sakai

Just Be Cool, Jenna Sakai by Debbi Michiko Florence

Cover for The Lost Things Club

The Lost Things Club by J. S. Puller

Cover for One Kid's Trash

One Kid’s Trash by Jamie Sumner

Cover for Why Longfellow Lied

Why Longfellow Lied: The Truth about Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride by Jeff Lantos

A Song of Frutas by Margarita Engle

Cover image for A Song of Frutas.

A Song of Frutas by Margarita Engle, illustrated by Sara Palacios (9781534444898)

A little girl tells of visiting her Abuelo in Cuba. When she is there, she helps him sell fruit from his small cart on the street. Together they sing the names of the fruits they have for sale, walking in beat to the song and shaking their hands like maracas. Their voices reach up the tall buildings around them and some people purchase fruit using a basket they lower down on a rope. There are other vendors on the street shouting or singing about their wares too, and that’s when Abuelo has to sing even louder to be heard. It’s most special to visit Abuelo at the new year when everyone wants to purchase 12 grapes per person to have good luck when they eat them at midnight. If only visiting Cuba was simpler and they could go more often!

Engle is an award-winning author of books for all ages of children. This picture book uses a mix of English and Spanish called Spanglish that is used both in the United States and Cuba. The songs that the girl and her grandfather sing together are done in rhyme while the rest of the picture book displays Engle’s skills with verse in a different way. Her paragraphs of free verse still play with rhythm and form, inviting readers to experience Cuba and their lively street vendors.

Palacios’ illustrations are bright and merry. They show the dynamic urban Cuban street scene that is full of colorful buildings and equally colorful people. The illustrations share that same inherent happiness as the words.

Bright and energetic, this picture book offers a glimpse of Cuba. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from e-galley provided by Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

11 New Picture Books Coming in August to Wake Your Brain Cells

Here are 11 upcoming picture books this month that have gotten starred reviews. There are some lovely treats from established authors, ones newly published in the U.S., and hopefully some nice surprises too.

Cover for Anteaters, Bats & Boas

Anteaters, Bats, and Boas: The Amazon Rainforest from the Forest Floor to the Treetops by Roxie Munro

Cover for Be Strong (Be Kind #2)

Be Strong by Pat Zietlow Miller, illustrated by Jen Hill

Cover for Child of the Flower-Song People

Child of the Flower-Song People: Luz Jiménez, Daughter of the Nahua by Gloria Amescua, illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh

Cover for The Fastest Girl on Earth!

The Fastest Girl on Earth!: Meet Kitty O’Neil, Daredevil Driver! by Dean Robbins, illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley

Cover for The Little Wooden Robot and the Log Princess

The Little Wooden Robot and the Log Princess by Tom Gauld

Cover for Moon Pops

Moon Pops by Heena Baek

Cover for Negative Cat

Negative Cat by Sophie Blackall

Cover for New in Town

New in Town by Kevin Cornell

Cover for Poultrygeist

Poultrygeist by Eric Geron, illustrated by Pete Oswald

Cover for A Song of Frutas

A Song of Frutas by Margarita Engle, illustrated by Sara Palacios

Cover for Survivor Tree

Survivor Tree by Marcie Colleen, illustrated by Aaron Becker

To Tell You the Truth by Beth Vrabel

Cover image for To Tell You the Truth.

To Tell You the Truth by Beth Vrabel (9781534478596)

Gran told Trixy stories from the time she was born. No one else believed Gran’s stories were true, but Trixy knew they were. After Gran’s death, Trixy holds on to her stories, particularly the one she promised to never tell. Gran told Trixy that stories weren’t meant for everyone, because sometimes they can’t be heard. When her teacher tells her that she needs to write down a true story, Trixy borrows one from Gran. It’s a story that is unbelievable, combining cake, theft and Liberace. Soon Trixy is telling lots of people Gran’s stories and submitting some for publication. Deep down she knows the stories are real, but can she prove it? It’s going to take telling some lies, doing some sneaking, and traveling across the state to meet people who knew Gran and can tell Trixy the real truth.

Vrabel has created a novel wrapped around a series of delightful short stories told in Gran’s voice. Through those stories and Trixy’s memories, readers gain a deep sense of who Gran was. The novel is an exploration of the power of stories that are shared, a question of what truth really is, and then an ending that will require a few tissues. The writing is marvelous with just the right amount of Southern charm. The play between the novel itself and the stories works amazingly well, combining richly together.

Trixy is a character who is holding not only stories but also secrets. Her relationships with others are difficult thanks to her prickly way with others. Trixy regularly believes that she is right, doesn’t listen to others, and in the process speaks hurtfully to them. At the same time, her pain over losing her beloved Gran is evident as is her need to connect with other people. She manages to transform those around her with her stories while at the same time also changing herself too.

A charming Southern novel about stories, loss, love and truth. Appropriate for ages 9-12.

Reviewed from copy provided by Atheneum.

Sonny Says Mine! by Caryl Hart

Cover image for Sonny Says Mine.

Sonny Says Mine! by Caryl Hart, illustrated by Zachariah OHora (9781547605804)

When Sonny finds a pink, soft bunny toy in the sandbox, he falls in love with it. He names it Bun-Bun and they spend lots of time playing together. Meemo, the dog, sniffs Bun-Bun but Sonny insists that Bun-Bun is “Mine!” Later, Honey and Boo come by. Boo is crying, because she has lost Suki, her favorite pink bunny. Honey searches everywhere for Suki, but Sonny keeps Bun-Bun out of sight. Honey even asks if Sonny has seen Suki, but Sonny says No! Sonny hides Bun-Bun in a safe place and then heads to help Boo feel better, but she doesn’t want to play. She is even too sad to eat cake. Now it is up to Sonny to see if he will do the right thing or not.

This is the first in a new series of books featuring these four characters. This first book looks at sharing and telling the truth. Hart’s animal characters have big personalities and their relationships with one another are well drawn and interesting. They are written as small children and show the same mistakes and learning.

OHora’s illustrations work really well here with their bright colors and simplicity. The emotions on their faces are clear and add to the understanding of how difficult the choices are for Sonny as he struggles with his desire for the toy and the need to make his friend feel better.

A charming new series starter that will start conversations about sharing and choices. Appropriate for ages 2-4.

Reviewed from ARC provided by Bloomsbury.

News to Wake Your Brain Cells – July 30

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

22 dinosaur books every budding Ross Gellar will love – Motherly

The latest target of Hong Kong’s crackdown: children’s books – The New York Times

Notable 2021 children’s book follow-ups, sequels, and companion books – 100 Scope Notes

Picture books for children – reviews – The Guardian

Target collaborates with children’s book author Christian Robinson – StarTribune

These modern children’s books about princesses are inspiring – Romper

LIBRARIES

Activist who helped desegregate Birmingham library dies – Westport News

Are UK public libraries heading in a new direction? – OUPBlog

Censorship Scholar on book bans and Critical Race Theory – NPR

How do rural libraries serve patrons? – Book Riot

Saving libraries: it’s a critical time for funding legislation – Information Today

YA LIT

17 YA books that will make you shed a tear every time – Yahoo!

21 YA novels with disabled and chronically ill characters – BuzzFeed News

Over 40 complaints made about ‘unsuitable’ books on English curriculum – The Irish Times

Not Little by Maya Myers

Cover image for Not Little.

Not Little by Maya Myers, illustrated by Hyewon Yum (9780823446193)

Dot is the smallest person in her family. Everybody thinks that she’s too little to do things, but they are all wrong. She can do all sorts of things. She’s also the smallest person in her class. People even ask if she is in preschool. That’s when she proves them wrong by talking about all the things that she knows. When a new student joins her class, Sam is even smaller than Dot is. He is quiet and seems to be afraid of Dot. At recess, she sees that the mean boy is talking to Sam, and it’s clear he isn’t being nice. Dot decides to sit with Sam at lunch, both to talk to him about the bully but also to measure and make sure she is taller. Before she can reach the table though, the mean boy is there again and he is saying that Sam is a baby! Sam slumps lower and lower, while Dot gets angrier and angrier. The bully then makes the mistake of calling Dot little. But Dot has found her voice and knows she needs to stand up as tall and brave as she can.

Myers captures the indignities of being small for your age with Dot. Beautifully, Dot uses her words to fight back at the stereotypes, both by demonstrating what she knows out loud and also in the end by standing up to a bully. Dot’s push back at being called “little” is cleverly handled, as is her desire to not be the smallest when Sam arrives. It’s all lovely and richly human.

Yum’s illustrations show a protagonist from a multiracial blended family. Dot dresses in polka dots with bright colors that draw the eye directly to her on the page. Even if she is sometimes the smallest thing on the page, she is the focal point.

A big hearted book for tall and small alike. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from copy provided by Neal Porter Books.

On the Trapline by David A. Robertson

Cover image for On the Trapline.

On the Trapline by David A. Robertson, illustrated by Julie Flett (9780735266681)

A boy travels with his grandpa, Moshom, to his trapline up north. Moshom hasn’t returned to the trapline since he was a boy himself. The trapline is where people hunted animals and lived off the land, Moshom explains to his grandson. Once the small plane lands, the two meet one of Moshom’s old friends. They pull up to a small house near a big lake, but that is not the trapline. It’s where Moshom lived after they left the trapline. In the winter, everyone slept together in the room with the wood stove to keep warm. Moshom shows his grandson the ruins of the school he went to, where he was required to speak in English and not Cree. They head out on the water in a slow boat, until they finally reach the trapline. Moshom shows him where they trapped muskrats, where their tent was, and how they lived on the trapline. As they leave, the two of them can continue to envision the trapline as it is now and as it once was.

The Governor General Award winning team returns with a book about connection to the land, deep memories, family ties and generations sharing stories. The warm relationship between Moshom and his grandson, who narrates the book, is clear and central to the book. The grandson regularly asks whether this place is the trapline, until they reach the real trapline and it is clear. The book examines memories, both dark and happy, alongside physical discovery of the places. It’s a powerful look at experiences and connection.

As always, Flett’s illustrations are exceptional. Done in pastel and then manipulated digitally, they have a muted natural palette that works for both memories and current times. The greens are deep and rich, the blues offer clear skies and rich water.

A look at grandfathers, memories and the importance of place. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from library copy.

2021 Eisner Award Winners & Nominees

The 2021 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards were announced this week at Comic-Con. The awards have several categories specifically for comics for youth. Here are the winners and nominees in those categories:

BEST PUBLICATION FOR EARLY READERS (up to age 8)

WINNER

Cover for Our Little Kitchen

Our Little Kitchen by Jillian Tamaki

NOMINEES

Cover for Bear

Bear by Ben Queen and Joe Todd-Stanton

Cover for Cat Kid Comic Club

Cat Kid Comic Club by Dav Pilkey

Cover for Donut Feed the Squirrels

Donut Feed the Squirrels by Mika Song

Cover for Kodi (Book 1)

Kodi by Jared Cullum (Also nominated for Best Painter/Multimedia Artist)

Cover for Lift

Lift by Minh Lê and Dan Santat

BEST PUBLICATION FOR KIDS (ages 9-12)

WINNER

Cover for Superman Smashes the Klan

Superman Smashes the Klan by Gene Luen Yang and Gurihiru (Also won Best Adaption from Another Medium)

NOMINEES

Cover for Doodleville

Doodleville by Chad Sell

Cover for Go with the Flow

Go with the Flow by Lily Williams and Karen Schneemann

Cover for Mister Invincible

Mister Invincible: Local Hero by Pascal Jousselin (Also nominated for Best Writer/Artist)

Cover for Snapdragon

Snapdragon by Kat Leyh

Cover for Twins

Twins by Varian Johnson and Shannon Wright

BEST PUBLICATION FOR TEENS

WINNER

Cover for Dragon Hoops

Dragon Hoops by Gene Luen Yang (Also nominated for Best Reality-Based Work & Best Writer/Artist)

NOMINEES

Cover for Check, Please! Book 2

Check, Please! Book 2: Sticks and Scones by Ngozi Ukazu

Cover for Displacement

Displacement by Niki Hughes

Cover for Fights

Fights: One Boy’s Triumph Over Violence by Joel Christian Gill

Cover for A Map to the Sun

A Map to the Sun by Sloane Leong

Cover for When Stars Are Scattered

When Stars Are Scattered by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed (Also nominated for Best Graphic Memoir)