Tag: games

Don’t Blink by Tom Booth

Don't Blink by Tom Booth

Don’t Blink by Tom Booth (9781250117366, Amazon)

A little girl sits in the middle of the page, looking right at the reader. When a bird flies up and asks her what she is doing, she replies that she’s having a staring contest with the child reading the book. As the pages turn, more and more animals join the staring contest, until the page is crowded with an elephant, fox, frog, porcupine, owl, giraffe, monkey and many more. Even a slow-moving tortoise is heading to the game. But before the tortoise can get to the center of the page, everyone has blinked. Perhaps another try?

Booth’s playfulness is fully on display in this picture book. The book is entirely written in dialogue that is color-coded to the animal speaking with dotted lines to clarify who is saying something. With so many animals on the page, this book lends itself to lots of various voices which will also add to the fun. The illustrations are modern and friendly, even the alligator being more toothy than frightening. All of the animals looking directly at the reader is also very effective.

A great pick to share aloud and have children try to win the staring contest. Or maybe the next one! Appropriate for ages 2-5.

Reviewed from library copy.

 

The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Daywalt

The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Daywalt

The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Adam Rex (9780062438898, Amazon)

This picture book takes on a very familiar childhood game and turns it into a tale of battles and glory. It begins with Rock, who traveled the mysterious Forest of Over by the Tire Swing looking for warriors to battle. He fights and wins over Clothespin and Apricot but still hasn’t found a worthy foe. Paper is in the Home Office and also looking for battles. He takes on Computer Printer and Trail Mix and wins over both easily. Now he too is searching for harder battles. Scissors is in the Kitchen where she battles Tape and Breaded Chicken Dinosaurs and wins. Now the three strong warriors are on their way to finally meet one another. Who will win?

Daywalt has written this picture book with the voice of a world wrestling announcer. One can almost hear the crowd in the background and the pounding music as the battles rage. All of the fights have a sense of playfulness and wrestling to them, rather than war. They all echo the same feel of the hand game and amp it up considerably. This book is ideal for sharing aloud and begs for big voices and cheers.

Rex’s illustrations play on the drama of the text. They are action-filled and full of humor. The battles are shown in comic-book like stills, capturing the blaze of battle and the silliness of it all at the same time. The tone is perfection throughout.

A very silly, very fun book that is just right for a crowd of restless or wrestling kids. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from copy received from HarperCollins.

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau (9781939100092)

On a blustery spring day, Argyle wants to head outside and play. However, nothing works quite right due to the pesky wind gusts. He tries building a card tower and a gust blows it down. He tries creating a spider web of yarn and gets all tied in knots. He tries more robust games like pretending to be a knight or a pirate and each game is ruined by the wind. Argyle returns home sadly. His mother encourages him to keep on thinking about how he can successfully play outside in the wind. With lots of thought and even more work, Argyle comes up with a great solution perfect for a windy day.

Letourneau has created a picture book that celebrates the joy of playing outside even on a windy day. She shows the power of imagination as Argyle tries game after game. Then with some inspiration from his mother, Argyle himself solves the problem and finds a solution. The hard work he puts in is a critical part of the story as is his irrepressible spirit throughout.

The illustrations are very appealing. They have a delicacy to them that allows for small details that become ever more important as the story goes on. It isn’t until Argyle is in his room with all of the things he has used in his play earlier in the book that readers will suddenly see what the solution is. The clever art offers plenty of clues for children to be inspired before Argyle himself.

Perfect reading for springtime, this book invites children outdoors even on the windiest days, just make sure you have the right toy too! Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from e-galley received from NetGalley and Tanglewood.

We’re Going on an Egg Hunt by Laura Hughes

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We’re Going on an Egg Hunt by Laura Hughes (9781681193144)

This lift-the-flap picture book is a riff on the beloved We’re Going on a Bear Hunt reworked with an Easter theme. Here a family of rabbits head out to find eggs on a lovely spring day. There are ten hidden eggs on the pages and not every flap has an egg hidden behind it. Along the way, the rabbits encounter a series of obstacles and how to navigate things like lambs, bees and ducks. The final very large egg hides a wolf and the rabbits and the reader have to work together to foil him.

Hughes has done a nice job of incorporating the rhythm and structure of the original book into this springy Easter version. Even the obstacles themselves have a springtime theme. The wolf at the end makes for a delightful twist that creates the joy of rushing back through the obstacles in reverse order and returning home just in the nick of time.

The use of flaps is particularly enjoyable when combined with an egg hunt. Children will enjoy lifting the flaps which are fairly sturdy and should survive small hands well. There are surprises underneath some of them and the chance to count upwards to ten as well.

Great for sharing with a small group of children or one-on-one, there will be lots of demand to be the one to lift the flaps because it is such fun. My guess is you will be reading this one again and again. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from copy received from Bloomsbury.

Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout by Patricia C. McKissack

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Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn It Out!: Games, Songs & Stories from an African American Childhood by Patricia C. McKissack, illustrated by Brian Pinkney (9780375870880)

What a way to celebrate Black History Month! With plenty of games, songs, poems and stories, this volume happily combines them all into a delightful rhythm of rhymes, clapping and singing. While the book focuses on games and songs from an African-American background, children of various backgrounds will find new and familiar games on the pages. This mix of discovery and warm familiarity makes this a book that both invites exploration and gives everyone a place to stop and smile in recognition.

This book is almost an encyclopedia of games and songs. Page after page will have readers humming along, singing aloud and looking for a partner to play a newfound or best-loved game. The poetry section adds a real richness to the book, allowing it to slow from the fast pace of the games and songs. McKissack introduces each game, song or poem with a short paragraph about it. This creates a book that is far more than one game after another, adding historical information too.

Pinkney’s illustrations are pure movement on the page. They dance and swirl and tilt and play. Sweeps of color embrace the ink drawings, adding even more motion to the page. There’s a feeling of freedom in the illustrations, a playful wildness that is pure refreshment to the eye.

A book for every public library, this is a must-have. Appropriate for ages 6-9.

Reviewed from copy received from Random House Children’s Books.

In Plain Sight by Richard Jackson

in-plain-sight-by-richard-jackson

In Plain Sight by Richard Jackson, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney (InfoSoup)

Sophie lives with her parents and her grandfather who sits near the window during the day in his wheelchair. He can wave goodbye to her as she heads to school in the morning and is the first person she runs to see when she comes back home. Each day, she visits with her grandfather and he tells her the story of something that he has “lost” during the day. Then it is up to Sophie to find the lost item somewhere in his room. Each time she manages to find the hidden object somewhere in place sight, if she just looks closely enough. This lovely picture book shows a playful and warm relationship between grandparent and grandchild.

Jackson’s text is demonstrates how small daily rituals can become the foundation of a close relationship, each one designed to tell a story, share a moment and bring the two of them closer together. There is a warmth in the language they use with one another, a recognition of how important they are to one another. That relationship is all about playing together, spending these moments delighting in one another and the shared game.

Pinkney’s illustrations are filled with the small details that he is known for. The room of the grandfather is filled with shelves, papers, books and mementos. It’s an ideal background for an object search and one that is based in reality. Young readers get the chance to find the object themselves before Sophie shows them where it is. The organic feel of the art and these searches adds to the warmth and joy of this picture book.

A lovely depiction of a close grandparent relationship, this picture book also adds the pleasure of a well-done object search. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from library copy.

 

Review: Wednesday by Anne Bertier

wednesday

Wednesday by Anne Bertier

Little Round and Big Square are the best of friends.  Every week on Wednesday, they get together to play their favorite game: one of them says a word and they both transform into it.  Big Square starts with “butterfly” and the two of them change into butterflies, Big Square with sharp angles and Little Round with half circles.  They go through “flower” and “mushroom” until Big Square gets carried away and starts naming lots of different things all at once, things that Little Round can’t shift into.  Soon the friends are arguing, but just like with any friendship there are rough patches and they both have to figure out how to fix it. 

Done in just two colors, the dot and the square and the many shapes they make pop on the page, the blue and orange contrasting vibrantly on the white background.  It is the illustrations that tell the story here, and the strong style they are done in is striking.  Children will immediately relate to both the square and the circle.  They may not have faces, but they convey emotions clearly on the page from anger to exuberance to friendship. 

Strong and vibrant, this picture book translated from the French, is a great pick for units on friendship or shapes.  Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from copy received from Enchanted Lion Books.