Review: You Are (Not) Small by Anna Kang

you are not small

You Are (Not) Small by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant

An orange bear declares to a smaller blue bear that the shorter one is “small.”  The little one says that that is not true, rather the orange bear is “big.”  The orange bear shows that he has other big creatures just like him and just his size, but so does the blue bear.  The two groups start to argue and fight about whether they are big or small.  Then another creature arrives and another one yet that help put size into perspective for everyone. 

This very simple book has a great sense of humor throughout.  The creatures that seem like bears to me are fuzzy and friendly.  Against the white background, the bears pop on the page.  With only a few lines per page, this book will be enjoyed by small children learning about concepts like big and small.  The humor makes the entire lesson in size and relativity completely enjoyable and it will be a book that children will ask to be read again.  There is even a great little (or big) twist at the end.

Weyant’s illustrations are a large part of the appeal of the book.  The New Yorker cartoonist has created fuzzy creatures that are loveable and cute as can be, no matter what size they are.  Weyant has clearly loved playing with the differences in sizes, creating characters who live large on the page.

Bold illustrations, charming characters and funny situations make this a winning picture book for the smallest (and largest) among us.  Appropriate for ages 2-4.

Reviewed from ARC received from Two Lions.

A Monster Calls – The Movie

A Monster Calls

The Hollywood Reporter has the latest on the casting of the film version of Patrick Ness’ A Monster Calls.   Sigourney Weaver has now joined that cast that also includes Felicity Jones and Liam Neeson. Weaver will be playing the grandmother, Jones the mother and wonderfully, Neeson will be the monster.   Juan Antonio Bayona will be directing the Focus Features film. 

It’s an incredible read, so I hope they do it proud and keep the truly frightening aspects of the book without making the child character older.