In Plain Sight by Richard Jackson

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In Plain Sight by Richard Jackson, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney (InfoSoup)

Sophie lives with her parents and her grandfather who sits near the window during the day in his wheelchair. He can wave goodbye to her as she heads to school in the morning and is the first person she runs to see when she comes back home. Each day, she visits with her grandfather and he tells her the story of something that he has “lost” during the day. Then it is up to Sophie to find the lost item somewhere in his room. Each time she manages to find the hidden object somewhere in place sight, if she just looks closely enough. This lovely picture book shows a playful and warm relationship between grandparent and grandchild.

Jackson’s text is demonstrates how small daily rituals can become the foundation of a close relationship, each one designed to tell a story, share a moment and bring the two of them closer together. There is a warmth in the language they use with one another, a recognition of how important they are to one another. That relationship is all about playing together, spending these moments delighting in one another and the shared game.

Pinkney’s illustrations are filled with the small details that he is known for. The room of the grandfather is filled with shelves, papers, books and mementos. It’s an ideal background for an object search and one that is based in reality. Young readers get the chance to find the object themselves before Sophie shows them where it is. The organic feel of the art and these searches adds to the warmth and joy of this picture book.

A lovely depiction of a close grandparent relationship, this picture book also adds the pleasure of a well-done object search. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from library copy.

 

Coyote Moon by Maria Gianferrari

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Coyote Moon by Maria Gianferrari, illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline (InfoSoup)

Coyote wakes and heads out of her den to find food for her pups. She walks the roads past houses and fences. She finds a mouse but doesn’t manage to catch it. There are geese on the golf course, but Coyote can’t get close enough to steal an egg without the geese attacking her. There is a rabbit on a lawn, but the rabbit is faster than Coyote. Soon dawn arrives and Coyote still has not caught any food for her family. Then there are turkeys walking nearby and Coyote manages to capture one. She heads home but not before a child spies her from a window when Coyote stops to sing to the morning.

This book is a beautiful dance between illustrations and text. Gianferrari’s prose is extremely poetic, using phrasing that almost turns it into verse particularly when read aloud. The pacing of the book is dynamic and picks up with a sense of near desperation as one prey animal after another escapes. Sympathy for the coyotes, which may not have been high in the beginning of the book, is skillfully built throughout the story until readers will be near cheering when the turkey is caught. The book finishes with information on coyotes.

Ibatoulline’s illustrations are incredibly detailed. Dark and light play on the page, from the electric outdoor lights from human buildings to the moonlight shining on fur. The darkness has dimension, subtle colors, and textures. There is a sense of near hyper-realism as well as readers get closer to these animals in the illustrations than they ever could in life.

This picture book blends nonfiction with great writing to create a realistic view of urban coyotes. Appropriate for ages 5-7.

Reviewed from library copy.