Day: November 14, 2016

10 Great Picture Books on Quietness

There is something powerful about quiet and silence. It’s another important thing for children to learn, that silence is not frightening but offers space to think and dream. May you find time today for your own quiet time.

Before Morning An Egg Is Quiet

Before Morning by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Beth Krommes

 

An Egg Is Quiet by Dianna Aston, illustrated by Sylvia Long.

Leave Me Alone May the Stars Drip Down

Leave Me Alone by Vera Brosgol

May the Stars Drip Down by Jeremy Chatelain, illustrated by Nikki McClure

The Night World The Quiet Book

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein

The Quiet Book by Deborah Underwood, illustrated by Renata Liwska

The Sound of Silence Tiptoe Tapirs

The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito, illustrated by Julia Kuo

Tiptoe Tapirs by Hanmin Kim

Waiting  The White Cat and the Monk: A Retelling of the Poem “Pangur Bán”

Waiting by Kevin Henkes

The White Cat and the Monk by Jo Ellen Bogart, illustrated by Sydney Smith

 

Gertie’s Leap to Greatness by Kate Beasley

gerties-leap-to-greatness-by-kate-beasley

Gertie’s Leap to Greatness by Kate Beasley (InfoSoup)

Gertie doesn’t know her mother at all, since she left Gertie and her father behind. Gertie lives with her aunt and father, who is often gone working on an oil rig. But when a For Sale sign goes up on her mother’s home and she expects to leave town soon, Gertie discovers that she wants to prove to her mother that she should never have left. So Gertie goes on a mission to become the best fifth-grader in the universe. When school starts though, there is a new student in her class, Mary Sue Spivey, who seems to be a lot more likely to be the best. She gets perfect grades, their teacher loves her, and even Gertie’s best friend befriends Mary Sue. When tryouts for the play come though, Gertie is selected as the lead, but can she actually become the perfect fifth grader and get her mother to witness it?

Beasley has created a story filled with characters who are vastly human. Gertie herself struggles with success, has trouble keeping her strong personality under wraps, sets herself immense goals through her missions, and yet has a huge heart and a desire to do the right thing. That right thing though is often warped under her reasoning into something that many people might see as overtly wrong.

The book has plenty of twists and turns, all based on Gertie herself and what she is creating around her. Sometimes that is good things and other times it is pure trouble. She also discovers that young people can be “fickle” and uses that word to keep herself from being too overly concerned when they turn against her and also too caught up in when they like her again.

Ideal for children who enjoyed Clementine, this book has humor, pizzazz and one great heroine. Appropriate for ages 7-10.

Reviewed from e-galley received from Edelweiss and Farrar, Straus and Giroux.