2019 Eisner Award Winners

The Eisner Awards, which celebrate the comic book industry, were announced at Comic-Con. Here are the winners in the categories for children and teens as well as other winners that are books for younger ages:

BEST CONTINUING SERIES and BEST HUMOR PUBLICATION

Giant Days, Vol. 1 (Giant Days, #1)

Giant Days by John Allison and Max Sarin

 

BEST WRITER/ARTIST

The Prince and the Dressmaker

Jen Wang for The Prince and the Dressmaker

 

BEST PUBLICATION FOR EARLY READERS (up to age 8)

Johnny Boo Book 8: Johnny Boo and the Ice Cream Computer

Johnny Boo and the Ice Cream Computer by James Kochalka

 

BEST PUBLICATION FOR KIDS (ages 9-12)

The Divided Earth (The Nameless City, #3)

The Divided Earth by Faith Erin Hicks

 

BEST PUBLICATION FOR TEENS 

The Prince and the Dressmaker

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang

 

BEST U.S. EDITION OF INTERNATIONAL MATERIAL

Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World

Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu, translated by Montana Kane

Review: We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett

We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett

We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett (9780316417273)

The war has been going on for years, the Union of the North now scrambling to keep ahead of the flying machines that are being used by the Elda. When her city is firebombed, Revna barely escapes death as she leaves her factory job in her wheelchair. The only reason she survives is that she uses illegal Weave magic to save herself; yet by doing so she reveals her powers. Her father is already in prison, so Revna expects the worst. She is saved by a new program that will teach female pilots to fly using Weave magic. That same program is where Linne finds herself after being discovered to be female while she served in the Union military. The daughter of a Union general, she desperately wants to fight rather than fly. Linne doesn’t trust Revna to be more than a liability thanks to her prosthetic limbs. Still, the two of them form a team in the air, neither of them willing to give up their one chance to fight and fly.

Bartlett weaves fantasy with a military story line that really creates something special on the page. Coming into a war that has been ongoing for years gives the book an immediate fatigue and desperation. It is that backdrop that allows the entire premise of the book to work, and one that is immediately believable. The world building is sound and interesting, based on the Soviet Night Witches who flew in World War II. The naming conventions in the book reflect that Soviet influence as well.

The story is told from the point of view of both main characters. Revna is a young woman who has been scarred by an accident, saved by her father, and then has suffered losses. She makes friends easily, yet is angered when people treat her as if she needs coddling. Linne meanwhile is pure steel, fighting to be taken seriously and always managing to anger the other female pilots along the way. She takes honor very seriously, clinging to the military structure to keep her world aright. Their interactions are difficult and angry, exactly what this book need to set it on fire.

A dramatic and magical look at war, resilience and respect. Appropriate for ages 14-17.

Reviewed from library copy.