Study Shows Children Prefer Paper

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New research from Australia shows that children are more likely to read the paper version of books rather than on devices. The study looked at children in Year 4 and 6 who had access to e-reading devices. It showed that children did not tend to use their devices for reading even if they were regular readers in general.

In fact, the research showed that the more devices a child had access to, the less likely they were to read in general. In other words, access to e-reading devices inhibited reading.

These findings mirror those of previous research of teenagers and college students, showing that they all prefer to read on paper.

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau

Argyle Fox by Marie Letourneau (9781939100092)

On a blustery spring day, Argyle wants to head outside and play. However, nothing works quite right due to the pesky wind gusts. He tries building a card tower and a gust blows it down. He tries creating a spider web of yarn and gets all tied in knots. He tries more robust games like pretending to be a knight or a pirate and each game is ruined by the wind. Argyle returns home sadly. His mother encourages him to keep on thinking about how he can successfully play outside in the wind. With lots of thought and even more work, Argyle comes up with a great solution perfect for a windy day.

Letourneau has created a picture book that celebrates the joy of playing outside even on a windy day. She shows the power of imagination as Argyle tries game after game. Then with some inspiration from his mother, Argyle himself solves the problem and finds a solution. The hard work he puts in is a critical part of the story as is his irrepressible spirit throughout.

The illustrations are very appealing. They have a delicacy to them that allows for small details that become ever more important as the story goes on. It isn’t until Argyle is in his room with all of the things he has used in his play earlier in the book that readers will suddenly see what the solution is. The clever art offers plenty of clues for children to be inspired before Argyle himself.

Perfect reading for springtime, this book invites children outdoors even on the windiest days, just make sure you have the right toy too! Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from e-galley received from NetGalley and Tanglewood.

2017 Klaus Flugge Prize Longlist

This is the second year of the Klaus Flugge Prize for illustration. It is given to “the most promising and exciting newcomer to children’s book illustration.” There are 15 books on the longlist for this British prize:

Animal Surprises Baxter’s Book

Animal Surprises by Abbie Cameron, written by Nicola Davies

Baxter’s Book by Hrefna Bragadottir

Bob the Artist Duck Gets A Job

Bob the Artist by Marion Deuchars

Duck Gets a Job by Sonny Ross

28645701 Hannah and Sugar

First Snow by Bomi Park

Hannah and Sugar by Kate Berube

28953856 28818766

Hiding Heidi by Fiona Woodcock

The Journey by Francesca Sanna

28114595 Little Mouse's Big Breakfast

Life is Magic (Rabbit Magic in the US) by Meg McLaren

Little Mouse’s Big Breakfast by Christine Pym

Little One Little Red

Little One by Jo Weaver

Little Red by Bethan Woollvin

The Lonely Giant The Museum of Me

The Lonely Giant by Sophie Ambrose

The Museum of Me by Emma Lewis

A World of Information

A World of Information by James Brown, written by Richard Platt

Olga and the Smelly Thing from Nowhere by Elise Gravel

Olga and the Smelly Thing from Nowhere by Elise Gravel

Olga and the Smelly Thing from Nowhere by Elise Gravel (9780062351265)

When Olga discovers an unusual creature, she soon realizes as she researches it that she has potentially discovered a new species. She dubs the species olgamus ridiculus and names her particular specimen “Meh” because of the noise he makes. Olga knows some things about Meh, she knows he has rainbow-colored poop, that he smells bad, that he loves to sleep in buckets, and that he can hold things with his tail. Unfortunately though, Olga doesn’t know what to feed him and he has rejected almost everything she has. Luckily though, Olga has friends in her community to help, even if she personally prefers animals to humans, including a librarian, an owner of an unusual food store, and maybe even a new boy she just met. It will take all of them to figure out the answers to Meh along with some help from unlikely people as well.

Gravel embraces the science of discovering a new creature in this elementary-school novel. The book keeps a light and playful tone as it demonstrates the process of discovery, research and investigation. Olga is a character who embraces her role as a scientist, taking it very seriously that things are documented appropriately as she works through figuring out Meh and his species. Throughout the book, humor and silliness prevail, making it very readable.

The use of plenty of illustrations makes this book all the more approachable for children. The illustrations almost create a graphic novel here, creating even more of the playful tone of the text. The illustrations are colored only with pink and red and drawn in a loose cartoon style that works well.

A welcome addition of a young female scientist as a main character of an elementary graphic novel. Appropriate for ages 6-8.

Reviewed from copy received from HarperCollins.

This Week’s Tweets, Pins and Tumbls

Here are some cool links I shared on my Twitter, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts this week:

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

2016 Children’s Book Sales in Review: A CBC Panel

Author Paula Fox, Newbery Medal winner and grandmother of Courtney Love, dies at 93

An inspirational story… Dav Pilkey, A Real-Life Superhero via

Movie Alert: ‘Boss Baby’

Nancy Willard, Prolific Children’s Book Author, Dies at 80

Newbery Magic: Adam Gidwitz in conversation with Kelly Barnhill

Top 10 Tips for Parents of Kids Who HATE to Read

When Your Kid Asks a Question, Hand Them a Book—Not a Phone – https://t.co/3uXU9tzdQI

LIBRARIES

Denver Public Library offering more than just books

How NYC’s First Puerto Rican Librarian Brought Spanish To The Shelves

Libraries evolving in the digital age

Protect Your the Medieval Way, With Horrifying Book Curses  – https://t.co/2rvaRVy9Ya

The US-Canada Border Runs Through This Tiny Library – http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-us-canada-border-runs-through-this-tiny-library

TEEN LIT

Booklist: Read-a-Likes for Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon – The Hub

“The Hate U Give”: Angie Thomas’ sensational debut novel should be required reading for clueless white people

Jeff Zentner’s On ‘Goodbye Days,’ Why He Writes For Teens, And What Comes Next

Sam Sorts by Marthe Jocelyn

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Sam Sorts by Marthe Jocelyn (9781101918050)

All of Sam’s toys are in a heap on his floor. It’s time for him to clean up. He finds one unique toy, then two dinosaurs, and counts upwards. But there are other ways to sort toys into categories. Maybe by what they are made from or their shape. And then there are the toys that fall into both categories. Some of them rhyme with each other. Others have the same pattern on them. They can be every color in the rainbow or have qualities that make them similar like being fuzzy or smelly. Some float. Others fly. So many ways to sort!

Jocelyn has created a book that is all about the concept of sorting items into categories. Again and again, she shows that toys can be put into any number of categories. It’s all in how you look at them. The book also incorporates counting on some of its pages. It’s a book that is perfect for more conversations outside of the ones in the text. Questions of finding other toys that fit the new categories on the page, or even thinking of other categories that Sam hasn’t used yet. There’s plenty to be creative about here.

Jocelyn’s illustrations are done in cut paper collage. Some items have a lovely depth to them, created by shadows on the page. On another two pages, there are shadows on the wall that add to the fun. On other pages real objects appear with drawings of others. This is a vibrant visual feast where children will want to look closely at the items and talk about how they match or don’t match.

Have items on hand to sort to continue the conversations started with this creative look at sorting. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from e-galley received from NetGalley and Tundra Books.

 

Yours Sincerely, Giraffe by Megumi Iwasa

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Yours Sincerely, Giraffe by Megumi Iwasa, illustrated by Jun Takabatake (9781927271889)

Giraffe is bored and he’s just missing one thing: a best friend. So when he sees Pelican, who is also bored, offering a mail service, he decides to write a letter. He asks Pelican to deliver it to the first animal he sees past the horizon. Pelican sees that the horizon looks very close, so he agrees. Pelican meets a seal who also delivers mail and sends the letter on to the next animal, which happens to be a Penguin. Giraffe and Penguin become pen pals and steadily become good friends. Soon Giraffe is trying to figure out what Penguin looks like from afar, but doesn’t get it quite right.

First published in Japan, this book is a very friendly chapter book with plenty of illustrations to break the text into manageable chunks. There is a warm playfulness throughout the book, inviting readers to see the humor in boredom and the solution of taking some sort of action to break through the tedium. The characters are well drawn and interesting, each with a unique personality that plays through naturally in the book.

The illustrations by Takabatake are done in fine lined black ink. They have a cartoon feel that embraces the light tone of the book. The illustrations work well with the text, creating action on the page that is very appealing.

A light and warm look at boredom and friendship that is a great read aloud. Appropriate for ages 6-8.

Reviewed from copy received from Gecko Press.