Judging the Cybils

cybils

I am ecstatic to be joining the Round 2 Judging Panel for Young Adult Speculative Fiction at the 2013 Cybils.  Having done Round 1 in previous years, I have the utmost respect for the vast amount of reading the first round judges have to accomplish.  I am also very pleased that the amazing Sheila Ruth is once again the coordinator for the category. 

Here are the other judges.  I look forward to working with all of the others in Round 2!

Round 1

Sheila Ruth, Wands and Worlds
http://blog1.wandsandworlds.com
@sheilaruth

Tanita Davis, Finding Wonderland
http://writingya.blogspot.com

Hallie Tibbets,Undusty New Books
http://www.undusty.com
@hallietibbetts

Leila Roy, Bookshelves of Doom
http://bookshelvesofdoom.blogs.com
@bkshelvesofdoom

Karen Jensen Teen, Librarian’s Toolbox
http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com
@tlt16

Patrice Caldwell, Whimsically Yours
http://whimsicallyours.com/
@whimsicallyours

Sarah Gross, The Reading Zone
http://thereadingzone.wordpress.com
@thereadingzone

Round 2

Sam Musher, Parenthetical
http://www.parenthetical.net
@MsParenthetical

Tasha Saecker,Waking Brain Cells
http://wakingbraincells.com
@tashrow

Tirzah Price,The Compulsive Reader
http://thecompulsivereader.com
@compelledtoread

Kimberly Francisco,Stacked Books
http://www.stackedbooks.org
@kimberlymarief

Karin Perry, Karin’s Book Nook
http://www.karinsbooknook.com
@kperry

Review: This Is the Rope by Jacqueline Woodson

this is the rope

This Is the Rope: A Story from the Great Migration by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by James Ransome

Based on Woodson’s own family, this is the story of how one piece of rope serves as a symbol for the changes that came during the Great Migration of African Americans from the rural south to northern cities.  One little girl tells the story of how her grandparents moved to New York City, using the rope to tie their things to the top of the car.  The rope was used to tie up the drying flowers from their window boxes that reminded them of home.  It was used by the little girl’s mother to tug her toys and play jump rope.  It tied her mother’s belongings to another car when she went off to college.  Then it was used for more jump rope with the little girl and in the end to support the banner for their family reunion.  In the end, it was returned to the original grandmother in exchange for a new rope to jump with. 

Woodson adheres to a strict structure in this book that really makes it feel like folklore, connecting it verbally to other histories, other migrations, other families.  Each page begins with “This is the rope…” and then moves on to tell the next thing that the rope was used for in this changing family.  Turning the pages, readers can see the time change and the opportunities progress. 

Ransome’s illustrations are lovely.  His paintings capture light and its movement as well as the family as they change.  Most of them catch those fleeting moments of life, each connected by the symbol of rope.  The result is a rich and warm series of memories.

Beautifully written and illustrated, this book captures a period of time not seen in most picture books and a story of one family’s history.  Appropriate for ages 5-7.

Reviewed from copy received from Nancy Paulsen Books.

National Book Award Longlist for Young People’s Literature

The National Book Awards announced its first longlist today with the ten finalists for the 2013 award for Young People’s Literature.

Here is the list:

Boxers & Saints Boxed Set Far Far Away Flora and Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures

Boxers & Saints by Gene Luen Yang

Far Far Away by Tom McNeal

Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo

Picture Me Gone The Real Boy The Summer Prince

Picture Me Gone by Meg Rosoff

The Real Boy by Anne Ursu

The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson

A Tangle of Knots The Thing About Luck

A Tangle of Knots by Lisa Graff

The Thing about Luck by Cynthia Kadohata

The True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp Two Boys Kissing

The True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp by Kathy Appelt

Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan