Day: March 20, 2017

2017 British Book Awards

A Children’s book category was added last year to the British Book Awards. Winners will be selected by a panel of judges and then the overall winning book will be selected by another panel. Here is the shortlist for the 2017 award for the Children’s category:

The Christmasaurus The Girl of Ink and Stars

The Christmasaurus by Tom Fletcher, illustrated by Shane Devries

The Girl of Ink and Stars by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts One and Two (Harry Potter, #8) Nadiya's Bake Me a Story: Fifteen Stories and Recipes for Children

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne

Nadiya’s Bake Me a Story by Nadiya Hussain, illustrated by Clair Rossiter

Oi Dog! The World's Worst Children

Oi Dog! by Kes and Claire Gray, illustrated by Jim Field

The World’s Worst Children by David Walliams and Tony Ross

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue (9780545925815)

Released March 28, 2017.

Sumac lives in a very unusual family in a very large house called the Camelottery. Her family is large, very large, with four parents, a baby, several teenagers, even more children and lots of pets. The four parents are really two couples who are all best friends with one another. All of the children are home schooled and there is always something happening around the busy house. Then something changes, and one of Sumac’s grandfathers moves in with them. He’s not used to the wildness of children, the busyness of the large household and his struggle with dementia isn’t helping. Sumac is appointed as the one to help him better understand their family, but after he makes several comments about the color of their skins and the way they live, Sumac decides that it is up to her to find a different place for her grandfather to live where he will be happier and they will be rid of him. It’s really the perfect solution, isn’t it?

Oh how I adored this novel. The creation of a household where the parents won the lottery and no longer have to work but just care for their ever-growing household and volunteer for causes they believe in is lovely. Make it a family with parents who are gay and lesbian and the book becomes something very special. Add in the character of Brian who at age five is just starting to voice his preferred gender. Then mix in even more diversity with adopted children and biological ones all loving and living together.

Donoghue doesn’t just get the mix of characters right, she then gives them all voices that are so honest and true that they live on the page. The fast-paced conversations of the large family around the dinner table are immensely joyful even as they are sometimes strained. The patter of the conversations all have a natural rhythm and flow, something that is very difficult to get this right. And my goodness, it is exactly right.

A grand new LGBT-friendly book that families will love sharing together no matter how many mothers, fathers or children they have. Appropriate for ages 8-11.

Reviewed from ARC received from Arthur A. Levine Books.