Day: April 14, 2017

This Week’s Tweets, Pins and Tumbls

Here are some cool links I shared on my Twitter, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts this week:

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

Colorful Poetry: 22 Diverse Poetry Picture Books for Kids via

Emma Donoghue’s New Novel Makes Diversity an Understatement

Great interview with , author of BRONZE AND SUNFLOWER Book:

How Western Mass. became kids’ lit central – The Boston Globe

Jude Law Cast as Young Dumbledore

The world is facing a refugee crisis; half of them are children. Talk to kids about the need to help w. these books:

LIBRARIES

Bookmobiles and Beyond: new library services on wheels serve newborns through teens

Public Libraries May Be in Jeopardy Under Trump — So Here’s How to Support Them

TEEN LIT

3 On A YA Theme: Pansexuality

5 YA Reads on the Asian Immigrant Experience

Bulk up your TBR with over 175 YA books hitting shelves between April and June 2017:

Fave Five: Biracial Bisexual MCs in YA

Tales as old as time — The Horn Book

Poppy Louise Is Not Afraid of Anything by Jenna McCarthy

Poppy Louise Is Not Afraid of Anything by Jenna McCarthy

Poppy Louise Is Not Afraid of Anything by Jenna McCarthy, illustrated by Molly Idle (9780385390866, Amazon)

Poppy is not scared of anything at all. She likes spiders and snakes; she has monsters as imaginary friends; she loves the dark and scary stories. Her sister Petunia is seen as the more careful one. When Poppy is asked what kind of pet she’d like she thinks of tarantulas, sharks, or bears! Petunia tries to scare Poppy, but nothing seems to work. Sometimes, Petunia finds Poppy’s bravery handy like when she needs something out of the basement. Then one day, Poppy suddenly discovers that there are things that make her scared and she needs Petunia’s help to overcome it.

McCarthy’s writing is light and playful. She has created two very different siblings who manage to support one another even though they tease each other too. It’s a natural sibling dynamic that is neither overly sweet or too cantankerous. The story has plenty of action and moves ahead swiftly as Poppy’s bravery is shown again and again, though she has friends and family who also help keep her safe.

Caldecott Honor winner, Idle has illustrated this in her signature style. There is a lovely merriment in the illustrations. I particularly enjoy the boredom of Poppy on the children’s roller coaster as others are cheering, frightened or ill. It captures the entire book quite nicely.

A jolly picture book about bravery, sensibility and personal limits, this picture book is great fun. Appropriate for ages 3-5.

Reviewed from e-galley received from Edelweiss and Random House Books for Young Readers.