2019 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature

At the ALA Youth Media Awards, the 2019 Asian/Pacific American Awards for Literature in youth categories were announced. However, those announcements did not include the book given honor awards. Here is the full list of medal and honor recipients:

YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE WINNER

Darius the Great Is Not Okay

Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

 

YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE HONOR BOOK

The Astonishing Color of After

The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan

 

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE WINNER

Front Desk

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

 

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE HONOR BOOK

The House That Lou Built

The House That Lou Built by Mae Respicio

 

PICTURE BOOK WINNER

Drawn Together

Drawn Together by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat

 

PICTURE BOOK HONOR BOOK

Grandmother’s Visit

Grandmother’s Visit by Betty Quan, illustrated by Carmen Mok

 

Review: A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer

a curse so dark and lonely by brigid kemmerer

A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer (9781681195087)

Prince Rhen has been cursed along with his entire kingdom into repeating the same season over and over again until a girl falls in love with him. At the end of each season, he fails and turns into a monster who slays his own people. Now he is left with a single guardsman, Grey, who has pledged to stay at his side. Each season, Grey transports himself to Washington, D.C. and steals a girl to try to break the curse. Then one year, he steals Harper, a girl who was not his chosen one but instead one who tried to attack Grey and save the girl he was attempting to kidnap. Harper may not have been Grey’s choice, but now she is the only chance they have at breaking the curse since the sorceress who placed the curse has declared this the final season. As Harper steps into the role of princess, she refuses to conform to expectations. She is intent on making a difference to the suffering people of the kingdom even if they underestimate her due to her cerebral palsy. But will it be enough to end the curse? Will love come?

I approach every retelling of a fairy tale with trepidation. There are few that can really transform the tale into something new and fresh. Kemmerer does exactly that with her retelling of Beauty and the Beast. She creates two amazing male characters, each compelling in their own way and with their own special bond with one another too. She adds one of the nastiest sorceresses around, Lilith, who is willing to provide endless pain to Rhen, Grey and anyone else she can. Kemmerer then laces this story with the psychology of reliving the same year again and again, with immense failure, slaughter, remorse and despair. The result is a dark rather than dreamy story, filled with pain, blood, battles and strategy.

Harper is an incredible heroine. Her having cerebral palsy is interwoven into the story, not as an aside but as a part of her life experience that gives her context for helping others and seeing beyond the surface to their potential. She is honest and forthright, and yet willing to use subterfuge and lies to make a positive difference for those she cares about. She is entirely complicated and every inch a princess and heroine.

A great retelling of Beauty and the Beast, this book stands on its own merits. Appropriate for ages 14-17.

Reviewed from ARC provided by Bloomsbury.