Day: September 2, 2016

The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas

The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas

The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas, illustrated by Erin E. Stead (InfoSoup)

The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles lives in a small house on a hill near the sea where he watches for the glint of glass in the waves. It is his job to deliver any messages found in bottles to their rightful owner. Sometimes that means walking only a short distance and other times he must go on a long journey to deliver them. He wishes that one day he would find a message in a bottle that is meant for him, but he never does. One day though, he does find a message with no recipient mentioned. It is an invitation to a party on the beach. He heads into town and asks person after person if this is their message, but it doesn’t belong to any of them. He decides he must go to the party to apologize for not delivering the message to the right person. But what he finds there shows him that some messages are meant for him after all.

Cuevas writes with real poetry in this picture book. Her prose captures the essence of moments with gorgeous descriptions like, “Sometimes the messages were very old, crunchy like leaves in the fall.” The book celebrates the connection that letters bring each of us and takes readers back to a time when messages were written by hand, even if rarely placed in bottles. It is also a book that speaks to the importance of community and feeling like you belong, but also the vitality that can be found in taking the first step towards making that connection.

Stead’s illustrations are dreamy with their pastel colors and fine lined details. Some of them are almost like looking through a keyhole and watching while others encompass the page. There are pages filled with the water of the sea that show both the difficulty of the job and the loneliness of it too. Moments looking alone out of a window capture the isolation the Uncorker is feeling. The colors too add to the emotions of the images both during the isolation and later at the party.

A poetic and beautiful picture book that looks at letters, community and connections in a memorable way. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

Reviewed from ARC received from Dial Books.

 

This Week’s Tweets, Pins & Tumbls

Here are the links I shared on my Twitter, Pinterest, and Tumblr accounts this week that I think are cool:

You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend. - Paul Sweeney For more quotes and inspirations: http://www.lifehack.org/256073/pinterest-8?ref=ppt10:

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

11 Children’s Books That Help Kids Understand Sexism

15 Children’s Books That Help Kids Understand What Differently Abled Kids Are Up Against

19 Children’s Books That Help Kids Understand Feminism

betterbooktitles: Lois Lowry: The Giver Check out the new…

Books to help ease children and teens back into school

Books Your Kids Will Actually Like, Chosen by the People Who Know

I Censor the Books I Read to My Child. I’m Not Ashamed!

Jen Bryant on her research for SIX DOTS, which celebrates Louis Braille as the child inventor he was:

Milwaukee Barbershops Incorporate Books for Kids

The Unexpected, Trashy Joy of Reading Kids’ Books Written by Celebrities

LIBRARIES

Libraries have secrets: The private rooms of North Jersey’s public libraries – Arts and Entertainment

slumbering:

TEEN READS

7 YA Novels We Can’t Wait To Read This Fall

8 New Jane Austen-Inspired YA Books | Brightly

‘90% of YA is crap’: the debate that dominated the Edinburgh book festival